Returning To Work When You’re Breastfeeding – Part 1

This is Part 1 of a series of posts about how to manage breastfeeding while returning to (paid) work.  Returning to work can present some challenges, but with the right information and support, these challenges (like other breastfeeding challenges) can be negotiated and overcome.  Part 1 focuses on what you can do before the baby arrives to help the transition when you do go back to work. It CAN work.  You CAN continue to breastfeed your baby.  A few things can be done to make the transition easier for both of you. Before you leave work to have your baby, look into your options for returning.  Look into your leave entitlements, government support, job flexibility and ability to work some of your time from home.  Discuss what flexibility is available if you decide to take more leave than you initially anticipated.  Explore what breastfeeding facilities are available at your workplace.  Can your baby’s caregiver bring your baby to your workplace when they need a feed?  Is there a room where you would feel comfortable expressing milk?  Does your workplace have a child-care facility or family-friendly policy?  Do they have a specific breastfeeding policy?  Are they an accredited Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace? The Age-Old Question…. Do I REALLY have to go back to work?  Sometimes the answer is a resounding yes – for various reasons.  Whether for financial, career or personal reasons some people do have to go back to work.  Others decide to make some life changes in order to delay returning to work. Set A Date.  When you know your return to work date, it will be easier to put a plan together to make the transition easier.  For example mothers returning to work when baby is a few weeks old, will have a very different time than those returning when their baby is nearly one year old.  If your date changes, your plan may just need a little adjustment. Look into your child-care options.  Some people are happy with the local child-care centre, sometimes dad will be the stay-at-home carer.  Maybe nana is happy to look after her grandchild and often it’s a mix of formal and non-formal arrangements that can make going back to work, work.  Look into all your options and choose the one that is the best fit for you and your baby.  Some carers will need information on caring for a breastfed baby.  There is a good...
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Breastfeeding And SIDS

Evidence shows that breastfeeding is protective against SIDS.  Adjunct Professor, Jeanine Young reviewed international evidence and the analysis confirmed the link between a mother breastfeeding her baby and the reduced incidence of SIDS. The author is reported to have described the reason why breastfeeding is protective – ‘We think it’s multifactorial.  We know breastfed babies tend to rouse more easily than bottle-fed babies, and because women breastfeed frequently, the child is roused – and checked on- every few hours.’ Even more information supporting your decision to breastfeed your little one and to help you get through the nights of broken sleep when your baby is waking more frequently than you’d like. Here’s a link to an article from The Australian....
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Too Much Milk?

When we’re talking breastfeeding most people think more milk is better.  Some mothers, however, have a great ability to produce enough milk for their baby and then some. This can be the case in the early days when the hormones that stimulate milk production go into overdrive.  The mother may feel overfull (engorged).  The baby may have difficulty attaching because of the fullness of the breast. For most people, this initial ‘overdrive’ settles in the coming days and weeks as the baby regulates their supply.  For others, their breasts continue to supply more milk than the baby needs.  This may contribute to a baby whose behaviour is unsettled, who wants to suck very frequently and is producing lots of dirty nappies which may be green and/or frothy. Some mothers with an over abundant supply also find that their milk flow is very fast.  If the milk flows quickly, the baby may be able to deal with it well, or you might hear the baby splutter or come off the breast.  Some mothers find that their baby may cough or sound like they’re choking or milk may come out of their nose.  Some mothers will hear a clicking sound only when the faster milk flows. There are many measures that can be taken to help mothers and babies facing this situation.  Some of them are as simple as a change in feeding position and some of these take more effort and commitment to see improvement. If you’d like to discuss your breastfeeding challenges, please contact me.  As with other breastfeeding challenges, when managed well, this too will come to...
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