Breastfed Babies and Colds

During the cooler months, it seems more common for babies (and parents) to get a cold.  For adults this can be a minor inconvenience, but what about your baby?  Babies are obligatory nose-breathers, meaning they usually breathe through their nose.  When your baby gets a cold they may have a blocked nose, making feeding more challenging.  Breastfeeding during this time will Provide your baby with the components in breastmilk that combat illness Sustain your baby’s nutritional needs Maintain your supply Provide comfort for your baby who may not be feeling 100% During this time you may like to Allow your baby to feed frequently – they may prefer smaller feeds for a few days Allow your baby to come off and back on the breast several times during a feed.  If they are finding it difficult to breathe through a blocked nose, they may stop feeding in order to breathe Try putting a few drops of breast milk in their nose to help clear the mucous Spend lots of time comforting and cuddling a baby that is not feeling well and keep an eye on them.   If you are concerned about their health you might like to take them to contact a health professional, or call 13HEALTH (if in QLD). If your baby isn’t draining the breast well for a few days, you might like to consider whether you need to express some milk to maintain your supply during this time.  If you think you need some breastfeeding support during this time, you might like to contact me to arrange a...
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Gold Coast Lactation Consultant

My services are aimed at parents and parents-to-be in North Brisbane.  If you live at the Gold Coast, I can happily recommend Shona Cassels IBCLC.  Shona is a lactation consultant who is nurturing, evidence-based and committed to quality care of parents, parents-to-be and their babies. Shona came to the Gold Coast in 1997, from Scotland.  After having her two children, she qualified as an ABA counsellor and subsequently qualified as an IBCLC. Her website is...
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Partners Can’t Breastfeed

When expecting a baby, many partners find themselves in unfamiliar territory.  The physical changes are all happening to the mum – the belly is growing, the skin stretches when the baby’s foot kicks and the mother often feels very different.  Partners on the other hand, don’t usually feel any different physically but do start taking on other various roles – like protector and support person. It is these roles that can really make a huge difference to a mother and baby’s success at breastfeeding.  Research by the World Health Organisation suggests that a mother who’s partner is supportive of breastfeeding is more likely to reach their breastfeeding goals. I think this has a lot to do with the fact that when the baby’s parents are on the same page about breastfeeding, it helps them to make informed decisions about what is best for their baby and how to access support if there are breastfeeding challenges. Before a baby arrives, a partner can Go to a breastfeeding education session Learn about what’s normal for breastfed infants Talk to the mother about what their breastfeeding plan Know where to get help if it’s needed After the baby arrives, a partner can Advocate for your baby.  This means that the partner can be the ‘gate-keeper’ to the baby for hospital staff and visitors.  It may mean that you ask for information before making decisions, ask about alternatives, organise the visitors so that the mother can spend her time and energy on getting breastfeeding off to a good start and generally trying to make sure the mother and baby are supported. Do all the nappy changing (I can hear you groan, but she DID carry the baby).  This helps the partner to be aware of the fact that what goes in must come out.  It is often the partners who suggest that the baby is ‘always hungry’ and this can help them to see what the baby is really getting. Settle the baby after/between feeds.  Babies quickly learn that love comes from people other than their mother (and that love is not always associated with food).  Partners often develop a wonderful way of settling babies that is very different to the way a mother settles them.  This can really help the mum feel nurtured and the partner feel important and necessary in their baby’s life. Take the baby while mum sleeps.   This means that...
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Galactagogues (things that improve your milk supply)

The word galactagogue means a herb or medication that is commonly used to increase milk supply.  Some of these have been used safely for many, many years and others are relatively new. Different galactagogues are thought to work in different ways.  Some of the prescription medications are developed for another purpose (like controlling nausea) and the increase in milk supply was noted as a side effect.  Some of the herbs are taken as tablets, as a hot drink or mixed with food.  Prescription medications can only be obtained with a script from a doctor. When considering starting a galactagogue, there should always be a careful look at what is actually happening with the baby and with the mother.  There are many situations which can be remedied quickly by a simple change in the approach to feeding.  For some mums, simply letting the baby access the breast more would be enough to improve her supply. For other people, more involved strategies are needed, and these should be overseen by a lactation consultant (IBCLC).  This includes situations involving the baby not being able to maintain the mother’s supply.  When the breastfeeding management strategies are not enough, it may be time to consider a galactagogue. One of the most important things to remember is this – no matter what/how many galactagogues you take,  IF THE BREAST IS NOT DRAINED WELL AND FREQUENTLY, THEY PROBABLY WON’T WORK. If you are considering starting on a galactagogue, or are struggling with low supply, you might like to contact me to discuss your situation or book in for a consultation.  If you’ve used a galactagogue and have any comments about it, I’d love to see a comment from you...
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Breastfeeding Is Good For Mums Too

There are many advantages to breastfeeding – most people know how healthy it is for our babies, but not so many people know about the major advantages to us – THE MUMS.  Breastfeeding your baby is good for you -it…. Reduces a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer Reduces the risk of obesity in later life Women who breastfed for at least six months, in line with Government recommendations, had a lower body mass index in their 50s than those who had not Reduces risk of ovarian cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and many other serious health conditions If you need help reaching your breastfeeding goals, you can contact me to discuss your situation.  ...
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