The ‘Lazy’ Feeder

Every baby’s feeding duration/frequency/length of baby’s feeds is different and there are many variations of normal.  Many baby’s are described as ‘lazy feeders’ – when this is associated with unmanageable (sleepy/long/frequent) feeding or slow weight gain, it’s well worth looking into. There are many reasons why a baby’s feeding pattern may appear to be lazy.  The reasons are many and varied, but they all need a very thorough assessment by someone who has the time to take a full history and WATCH a full feed – from start to finish even if it takes an hour.  As an LC, this is what I do.  I listen to the mum and what she is seeing and feeling, I look at the baby and the pattern of weight gain, I listen and assess for swallowing and watch for tiny clues to tell me what is going on. When I’m assessing a mum and her bubba who is ‘lazy’, here’s some of the things I consider Is there a medical condition which is making this bubba lethargic – this could be severe jaundice or under-nutrition, a cardiac condition etc.  If this is a possibility, it’s time to seek medical attention while putting in a plan to support feeding Is this bubba having short feeds because he is getting a lot of milk in a short amount of time Is this bubba waiting patiently for his mum’s let-down which is inhibited – such as those effected by breast reduction Is this bubba premature and just not strong enough to do full breastfeeding yet Is this bubba falling asleep at the breast and taking a long time to feed because the milk is flowing really slowly or supply is low The lazy feeder is fine if mum and bub are happy, healthy and bubba is gaining weight – if this isn’t the case, they need to be assessed properly and a close eye kept on them. If you are concerned about your baby’s feeding, pattern of weight gain or finding breastfeeding unmanageable, please consider a consultation for a thorough assessment.     Photo...
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Cancellation Policy

Very occasionally, after someone has booked a consultation with me, they may need to change or cancel their booking.  If this is the case, my cancellation policy is as follows If a booking is cancelled more than 24hrs prior to the scheduled time, there is no charge payable. If a booking is cancelled less than 24hrs prior to the scheduled time, 50% of the consultation fee is payable I am happy to reschedule consultations when needed, but will only reschedule once.  There is no fee for this. If a consultation has been rescheduled by you and you are unable to have the consultation at the (second) scheduled time, this will be considered a cancellation.  See above for cancellation fees. When a consultation is cancelled at short notice, it can be difficult to fill for another mother who needed help but may have been turned away because of lack of availability.  The effect this may have on their breastfeeding journey may be quite detrimental. These policies are completely at my discretion, and may not be asserted depending on...
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Expressing Breastmilk

As a general rule if babies are given adequate access to the breast and are not separated from their mothers, expressing is not necessary.  However, if you have an unwell/premmie baby, are returning to work, having a few hours apart from your baby or working on increasing supply, knowing how to express your breastmilk for your baby can be a great skill to have. It’s important to remember that the amount you express is not an accurate reflection of how much milk you have – babies are often far more efficient. There are two ways to express milk – using a pump or hand expressing.  There are pros and cons for both, but both methods are a learned skill and often get easier with practice.  Having expressed my milk for several months, I have a personal interest in this topic.  With any type of expressing, the key to draining the breast is to stimulate a let-down – this makes the milk flow more freely and is how your baby gets most of their milk.  Information on let-down is HERE. Hand expressing is free, can be done almost anywhere and requires no power.  It is also much more gentle than some alternatives and is shown to be more effective in the first few days after your baby is born.  The down side is that it is very-much a learned skill and can be quite time-consuming.  This method is great for when your baby is very young or you need some milk to leave with your baby if you’re going out for the evening. For all pumps, it is important to find one that works for you and is COMFORTABLE.  Most pumps have a flange (the portion that sits on your breast) that comes in a variety of sizes.  Having the correctly fitting flange can make expressing much more effective and comfortable.  Pumps come in three basic varieties.  There are manual pumps, basic electric, double pumps and hospital-grade pumps. A manual pump uses suction to draw milk from the breast.  This is done using one or both hands.  These pumps are often inexpensive and are best for occasional expressing.  The downside is that it may be difficult to stimulate a let-down with these pumps as it’s a bit of  ‘hard work’. Basic electric pumps use either an electrical or battery power supply to do the suction for you.  Some of these pumps...
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Breast Refusal

When a baby refuses to go to the breast or goes to the breast very briefly before coming off crying it can be a very distressing time for everyone.  They may refuse one or both breasts. There can be many underlying reasons why a baby does not want to go to the breast.  Some of them are – Milk flow – too fast or too slow Milk supply – over supply or low supply Physical issues with baby or mum Difficulties attaching Baby is unwell Introduction of a bottle Baby is becoming distracted (often around 4 months) Hormonal changes with the mother Lots of other reasons No matter what the cause of breast refusal, it can be a challenging time.  If you find yourself in this situation, it’s important to try to find a cause for the breast refusal and correct it if possible.  For most babies, this is a temporary stage that they can move through with help.  In the meantime, supporting  your supply and making sure your baby is getting adequate nutrition will be a very high priority.  Accessing professional support and information to help you through a time like this can be invaluable.  There are many strategies to help overcome this situation, so if you want to discuss your issues with breast refusal or arrange a consultation, please contact me.   Image by Louisa...
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My Facebook Page

As an LC, I try to keep in sync with expectant and new parents, and what they need from my services.  During a consultation I often need to convey large amounts of information.  It can be very daunting for new parents to take all this in.  For this reason, I set up an easily accessible platform for this information – a facebook page to provide my clients (and anyone interested) with some information on breastfeeding and gentle parenting.  The aim of the page is to give people evidence-base information on infant sleep breastfeeding information expressing tips breastmilk science supportive organisations and services resources which may be helpful to a breastfeeding mother, her baby and family This page is much broader than my website, so please feel free to have a look around the page, comment and ‘like’ the page if it appeals to you.  Look for me under ‘Stacey Revie – Lactation Consultant’...
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