Blog


Thank you for having a look at my blog about all things breastfeeding.  The aim of my blog is to provide up-to-date breastfeeding information, support for mums (and dads) and links to some helpful sites.  I will be aiming to post fairly regularly and am hoping to have some guest bloggers.

A little about me.  I am married and have three beautiful children.  I have worked in ICU (intensive care units) for about 15 years and really enjoyed that part of my life.  I became interested in breastfeeding after my first child was born and breastfeeding didn’t go to plan.  I went on to have a very rewarding breastfeeding relationship with my other two children – thanks to an IBCLC.  Eight years ago I qualified as a breastfeeding counsellor and have subsequently qualified as an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC).

I’m very excited to be able to follow my passion for supporting breastfeeding mother/baby dyads by making it my business.  I look forward to any feedback (good or not so good) and hope you find the blog helpful.

Stacey Revie – IBCLC


The ‘Lazy’ Feeder

Posted by on Oct 18, 2017 in Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby, Uncategorized | 0 comments

The ‘Lazy’ Feeder

Every baby’s feeding duration/frequency/length of baby’s feeds is different and there are many variations of normal.  Many baby’s are described as ‘lazy feeders’ – when this is associated with unmanageable (sleepy/long/frequent) feeding or slow weight gain, it’s well worth looking into. There are many reasons why a baby’s feeding pattern may appear to be lazy.  The reasons are many and varied, but they all need a very thorough assessment by someone who has the time to take a full history and WATCH a full feed – from start to finish even if it takes an hour.  As an LC, this is what I do.  I listen to the mum and what she is seeing and feeling, I look at the baby and the pattern of weight gain, I listen and assess for swallowing and watch for tiny clues to tell me what is going on. When I’m assessing a mum and her bubba who is ‘lazy’, here’s some of the things I consider Is there a medical condition which is making this bubba lethargic – this could be severe jaundice or under-nutrition, a cardiac condition etc.  If this is a possibility, it’s time to seek medical attention while putting in a plan to support feeding Is this bubba having short feeds because he is getting a lot of milk in a short amount of time Is this bubba waiting patiently for his mum’s let-down which is inhibited – such as those effected by breast reduction Is this bubba premature and just not strong enough to do full breastfeeding yet Is this bubba falling asleep at the breast and taking a long time to feed because the milk is flowing really slowly or supply is low The lazy feeder is fine if mum and bub are happy, healthy and bubba is gaining weight – if this isn’t the case, they need to be assessed properly and a close eye kept on them. If you are concerned about your baby’s feeding, pattern of weight gain or finding breastfeeding unmanageable, please consider a consultation for a thorough assessment.     Photo...

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Cancellation Policy

Posted by on Nov 20, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Very occasionally, after someone has booked a consultation with me, they may need to change or cancel their booking.  If this is the case, my cancellation policy is as follows If a booking is cancelled more than 24hrs prior to the scheduled time, there is no charge payable. If a booking is cancelled less than 24hrs prior to the scheduled time, 50% of the consultation fee is payable I am happy to reschedule consultations when needed, but will only reschedule once.  There is no fee for this. If a consultation has been rescheduled by you and you are unable to have the consultation at the (second) scheduled time, this will be considered a cancellation.  See above for cancellation fees. When a consultation is cancelled at short notice, it can be difficult to fill for another mother who needed help but may have been turned away because of lack of availability.  The effect this may have on their breastfeeding journey may be quite detrimental. These policies are completely at my discretion, and may not be asserted depending on...

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Expressing Breastmilk

Posted by on May 5, 2014 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Painful Breastfeeding | 0 comments

Expressing Breastmilk

As a general rule if babies are given adequate access to the breast and are not separated from their mothers, expressing is not necessary.  However, if you have an unwell/premmie baby, are returning to work, having a few hours apart from your baby or working on increasing supply, knowing how to express your breastmilk for your baby can be a great skill to have. It’s important to remember that the amount you express is not an accurate reflection of how much milk you have – babies are often far more efficient. There are two ways to express milk – using a pump or hand expressing.  There are pros and cons for both, but both methods are a learned skill and often get easier with practice.  Having expressed my milk for several months, I have a personal interest in this topic.  With any type of expressing, the key to draining the breast is to stimulate a let-down – this makes the milk flow more freely and is how your baby gets most of their milk.  Information on let-down is HERE. Hand expressing is free, can be done almost anywhere and requires no power.  It is also much more gentle than some alternatives and is shown to be more effective in the first few days after your baby is born.  The down side is that it is very-much a learned skill and can be quite time-consuming.  This method is great for when your baby is very young or you need some milk to leave with your baby if you’re going out for the evening. For all pumps, it is important to find one that works for you and is COMFORTABLE.  Most pumps have a flange (the portion that sits on your breast) that comes in a variety of sizes.  Having the correctly fitting flange can make expressing much more effective and comfortable.  Pumps come in three basic varieties.  There are manual pumps, basic electric, double pumps and hospital-grade pumps. A manual pump uses suction to draw milk from the breast.  This is done using one or both hands.  These pumps are often inexpensive and are best for occasional expressing.  The downside is that it may be difficult to stimulate a let-down with these pumps as it’s a bit of  ‘hard work’. Basic electric pumps use either an electrical or battery power supply to do the suction for you.  Some of these pumps will allow you to vary the strength of the suction and/or rate at which the suction is done.  These pumps are more expensive and are generally effective for most mums who express semi-regularly, need to express for a day or so or are returning to work one or two days/week. Double electric pumps are usually high-end (expensive) or bulkier pumps.  The upside is that they can be used over a more extended time and can express both breasts at the same time, saving time.  These pumps are designed to be used for full-time return to work mums or for those mums who are separated from their babies for an extended time. Hospital-grade electric pumps are often hired on a weekly or monthly basis.  They are designed to be used for mums of premmie babies or those who need a very effective pump.  This pump is what I recommend when a...

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Breast Refusal

Posted by on Oct 17, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 2 comments

Breast Refusal

When a baby refuses to go to the breast or goes to the breast very briefly before coming off crying it can be a very distressing time for everyone.  They may refuse one or both breasts. There can be many underlying reasons why a baby does not want to go to the breast.  Some of them are – Milk flow – too fast or too slow Milk supply – over supply or low supply Physical issues with baby or mum Difficulties attaching Baby is unwell Introduction of a bottle Baby is becoming distracted (often around 4 months) Hormonal changes with the mother Lots of other reasons No matter what the cause of breast refusal, it can be a challenging time.  If you find yourself in this situation, it’s important to try to find a cause for the breast refusal and correct it if possible.  For most babies, this is a temporary stage that they can move through with help.  In the meantime, supporting  your supply and making sure your baby is getting adequate nutrition will be a very high priority.  Accessing professional support and information to help you through a time like this can be invaluable.  There are many strategies to help overcome this situation, so if you want to discuss your issues with breast refusal or arrange a consultation, please contact me.   Image by Louisa...

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My Facebook Page

Posted by on Oct 15, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

My Facebook Page

As an LC, I try to keep in sync with expectant and new parents, and what they need from my services.  During a consultation I often need to convey large amounts of information.  It can be very daunting for new parents to take all this in.  For this reason, I set up an easily accessible platform for this information – a facebook page to provide my clients (and anyone interested) with some information on breastfeeding and gentle parenting.  The aim of the page is to give people evidence-base information on infant sleep breastfeeding information expressing tips breastmilk science supportive organisations and services resources which may be helpful to a breastfeeding mother, her baby and family This page is much broader than my website, so please feel free to have a look around the page, comment and ‘like’ the page if it appeals to you.  Look for me under ‘Stacey Revie – Lactation Consultant’...

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What Happens During A Consultation?

Posted by on Oct 1, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Lactation Consulting, Painful Breastfeeding | 9 comments

What Happens During A Consultation?

If you have not seen a lactation consultant in private practice, you might be wondering what actually happens while I’m with you.  There is a general flow that I usually follow, but ultimately, I work around what the baby and the mother need.  All of my consultations are in your home. There are three basic types of consultations I provide – Breastfeeding Preparation Sessions (for before birth), Breastfeeding Not Going To Plan Consultations (after the baby’s born) and Return To Work Plans.  This post will discuss the Breastfeeding Not Going To Plan Consultation – which are the majority of my work. Before a consultation, there has usually been a brief phone/email conversation to establish what is needed and have arranged timing so that the baby will be looking for a feed at some point during the consultation.  We usually start with a short health history of mum , briefly discuss the birth and the potential impacts this may be having on breastfeeding and then we discuss how feeding has been going.  If your baby is not ready for a feed at this time, we discuss the likely things that may be going on and suggest some strategies that are likely to improve the situation – so you know what to expect and feel prepared when your baby is ready to feed. If the baby is showing feeding cues while we are discussing the birth or feeding history, I usually suggest we go back to the history after your baby has fed. After or during the feed (depending on the length and comfort level of the feed), we make a breastfeeding plan that the mother feels is manageable – trying to meet breastfeeding goals for both you and your baby.  We agree on a timeframe for you to contact me to discuss your progress (usually 24-48hrs depending on the situation)  After I leave, I email a summary of our discussion to you so that you can refer back to it when necessary. The consultation fee is payable on the day and includes follow-up with phone/text/email and a discount should another consultation be needed.  I do my accounts once/week usually and will email the paid invoice to you.  Some private health funds will give a rebate for my services. Things to do if I’m coming to you – Have your child health record handy (the red/maroon book) Write down any questions you have – even if you think they sound silly PJ’s are just fine – as are dirty dishes and piles of laundry If you have a pet, PLEASE make sure they are secured in another room.  I really do love animals, but pets can either be distracting or physically get in the way of me being able to do my job. Partners and support people are encouraged to be there when possible I will need to see at least part of a feed while I am there – please speak to me about your baby’s needs If you would like further information on whether you need a consultation, please call me on 0403 677 467, or fill in the information on the contact me page.  I look forward to hearing from...

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Weaning?

Posted by on Sep 16, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Weaning?

Weaning can be a joyous celebration of an amazing breastfeeding achievement for some and for others it can be a time of great distress and emotional turmoil.  There are lots of factors which influence how you feel about weaning.  One of them is what breastfeeding goals you set yourself.  If you’ve reached those goals – whether it’s to feed for 3 weeks or just to enjoy breastfeeding – will have a big influence on how you feel about weaning. Technically, weaning is the introduction of anything other than breastmilk into a baby’s diet.  This may be when you start solids or start to introduce a breastmilk substitute.  Most people understand weaning as the process of stopping breastfeeding. The decision to wean may be initiated by the baby, the mother or a mixture of the two.  If the baby is less than 12 months old and seems to be weaning, it may be that s/he is going through a period of breast refusal.  This can be a very distressing time for both the breastfeeding mother and her baby.  There are many techniques which can be used to encourage a baby to go back to breastfeeding, and support your supply in the meantime. If the baby is older than 12 months and starts the weaning process themselves, it may come as a shock to the mother and she may be distressed that her baby has initiated weaning before she is ready.  During these times, it can be helpful to discuss breastfeeding goals and strategies, to either support the weaning process or ways to encourage the baby back to the breast. If the mother is initiating weaning her baby, for whatever reason or age, it can be helpful to discuss the likely progress of this process and ways to reduce the risks both to your baby and to the mother.  A slow and gentle process can help the baby to adjust to the lack of breastmilk and let the mother’s supply dwindle naturally.  Very rarely, there is an immediate need to wean the baby off the breast, and in these cases much management may be needed to help the transition. In all cases of weaning – if you’re not ready to wean, but feel unable to continue – getting the right information and support can often help you to overcome the hurdle and continue to breastfeed until you feel the time to wean is right for both of you.  Please contact me if you would like to discuss your situation or would like to book a consultation. For more information on how to continue breastfeeding while returning to the workplace, please read my posts about Breastfeeding While Returning To Work – a 3 part...

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Asthma and Breastfeeding

Posted by on Sep 4, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Asthma and Breastfeeding

There has been much discussion in the last few years about the link between exclusive breastfeeding and asthma prevention.  Here’s an article from ScienceDaily.com discussing research supporting the view that exclusive breastfeeding duration reduces asthma-related symptoms in children. Breastfeeding May Prevent Asthma, Research Suggests ScienceDaily (July 22, 2011) — Feeding a baby on only breast milk and for up to 6 months after birth can reduce their risk of developing asthma-related symptoms in early childhood, according to new research.   The study, which is published online July 21, 2011 in the European Respiratory Journal, looked at the impact of the duration of breastfeeding and the introduction of alternative liquids or solids in addition to breast milk. The researchers, from the Generation R Study, Erasmus Medical Center in The Netherlands, used questionnaires to gather data from over 5,000 children. They ascertained in the first 12 months after birth whether the children had ever been breastfed, when breastfeeding was stopped, and whether any other milk or solids were introduced. Further questionnaires were completed when the children were aged 1, 2, 3 and 4 years to check whether they had any asthma-related symptoms. The results showed that children who had never been breastfed had an increased risk of wheezing, shortness of breath, dry cough and persistent phlegm during their first 4 years, compared to children who were breastfed for more than 6 months. The strongest links were seen with wheezing and persistent phlegm, as children were 1.4 and 1.5 times more likely to develop these symptoms if they had never been breastfed. Children who were fed other milk or solids during their first 4 months in addition to breast milk had an increased risk of wheezing, shortness of breath, dry cough and persistent phlegm during the first 4 years, compared to children who were exclusively breastfed for their first 4 months. While previous studies have shown a similar effect between breastfeeding and asthma risk, this research is the first that showed a link between the length of breastfeeding and the number of wheezing episodes. Also, this study found evidence that the first asthma-related symptoms occur earlier in life if children were breastfed for shorter lengths of time or not exclusively. Dr Agnes Sonnenschein-van der Voort, researcher at Generation R and lead author from the Erasmus Medical Center in The Netherlands, said: “The link of duration and exclusiveness of breastfeeding with asthma-related symptoms during the first 4 years was independent of infectious and atopic diseases. These results support current health policy strategies that promote exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months in industrialised countries. Further studies are needed to explore the protective effect of breastfeeding on the various types of asthma in later life.” Image by Sura...

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A Mother’s Testimonial

Posted by on Aug 28, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

A Mother’s Testimonial

Here’s a testimonial that I received from a lovely mum I worked with. “I contacted Stacey after a recommendation by a relative, and my baby and I are very thankful to have utilised her services.  At 6 weeks of age my baby began crying constantly and not sleeping.  My husband and I were at the end of our tether not completely understanding why.  Stacey was quick to realise the problem had been not enough food as I had been advised to feed on one breast every 3 hours due to an oversupply of foremilk that was causing baby very painful wind.  She helped me to get back to recognising my baby’s needs rather than a set routine that obviously was not working.  I instantly had a contented baby and although looking back on it now it would have made sense to see I had a hungry baby – sticking to the advice I was given, attending to a very distressed baby and sleep deprivation had really clouded my judgment.   Stacey also reassured me my baby was getting plenty of milk after assessing a feed.  Soon after increasing the feeds, offering both breasts and relaxing with the ‘routines’ that I had read so much about in books, I had a much more relaxed baby who began sleeping through the night when she was 7 weeks old.  As Stacey had suggested she would find her own sleeping pattern with time and she did.  Stacey also helped me work out a plan for returning to work that was excellent and put my mind at ease that it is possible to carry on with breastfeeding while working.   I thank Stacey for the way she was compassionate and understanding through the whole consultation.  Stacey was also very in tune with the demands and guilt that mothers feel and was very proactive in recognising and helping deal with my emotional health issues.   Her follow-up emails were a great support.  As breastfeeding comes with many challenges and ongoing changes as baby develops I would recommend Stacey’s lactation services to any breastfeeding mum who find themselves confused by all of the advice out there that isn’t working for them.” Danielle F For more testimonials from mums, please check out my testimonials...

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Breastfeeding Plans

Posted by on Aug 21, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Breastfeeding Plans

When someone finds out they are having a baby, a whole new world opens up.  There is often a huge focus on when/where/how the birth will take place.  People discuss at length, exactly how they are going to manage labour or a C/S.  No detail is left to the imagination and friends and family often like to give you their opinion on what your choices should be. This is not always the case with breastfeeding.  I often find that when I’m talking to mums of young bubs, they felt totally unprepared for the reality of life ‘on the other side’.  Most women think that because it is such a natural process that they don’t need to do any preparation for breastfeeding.  And while this is true for alot of mums, many women find that being informed may well have made their journey much easier. What are your choices in terms of breastfeeding, what can you do to help get breastfeeding off to a great start, what can you expect from a breastfeed and a breastfed baby, when do I need to get help, how long should I feed a baby, when should I change sides, how do I know that my baby is getting enough?  These questions are best answered before the baby arrives – when you (and your partner) are calm, well-rested and able to absorb information that can help you to make a smoother transition into breastfeeding.  It can also help to already be in contact with someone who is able to support you once your baby arrives, knows your individual situation and is expecting your call. Having a breastfeeding plan and information suited to your individual situation has helped many people to make better choices during the first few hours and weeks with their new baby.  If you would like to have a breastfeeding preparation session with me or would like to discuss  your individual breastfeeding needs, please feel free to contact me.   Image by adamr...

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Breastfed Babies and Colds

Posted by on Jul 29, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Breastfed Babies and Colds

During the cooler months, it seems more common for babies (and parents) to get a cold.  For adults this can be a minor inconvenience, but what about your baby?  Babies are obligatory nose-breathers, meaning they usually breathe through their nose.  When your baby gets a cold they may have a blocked nose, making feeding more challenging.  Breastfeeding during this time will Provide your baby with the components in breastmilk that combat illness Sustain your baby’s nutritional needs Maintain your supply Provide comfort for your baby who may not be feeling 100% During this time you may like to Allow your baby to feed frequently – they may prefer smaller feeds for a few days Allow your baby to come off and back on the breast several times during a feed.  If they are finding it difficult to breathe through a blocked nose, they may stop feeding in order to breathe Try putting a few drops of breast milk in their nose to help clear the mucous Spend lots of time comforting and cuddling a baby that is not feeling well and keep an eye on them.   If you are concerned about their health you might like to take them to contact a health professional, or call 13HEALTH (if in QLD). If your baby isn’t draining the breast well for a few days, you might like to consider whether you need to express some milk to maintain your supply during this time.  If you think you need some breastfeeding support during this time, you might like to contact me to arrange a...

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Gold Coast Lactation Consultant

Posted by on Jul 29, 2012 in Lactation Consulting | 0 comments

Gold Coast Lactation Consultant

My services are aimed at parents and parents-to-be in North Brisbane.  If you live at the Gold Coast, I can happily recommend Shona Cassels IBCLC.  Shona is a lactation consultant who is nurturing, evidence-based and committed to quality care of parents, parents-to-be and their babies. Shona came to the Gold Coast in 1997, from Scotland.  After having her two children, she qualified as an ABA counsellor and subsequently qualified as an IBCLC. Her website is...

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Partners Can’t Breastfeed

Posted by on Jul 23, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Partners Can’t Breastfeed

When expecting a baby, many partners find themselves in unfamiliar territory.  The physical changes are all happening to the mum – the belly is growing, the skin stretches when the baby’s foot kicks and the mother often feels very different.  Partners on the other hand, don’t usually feel any different physically but do start taking on other various roles – like protector and support person. It is these roles that can really make a huge difference to a mother and baby’s success at breastfeeding.  Research by the World Health Organisation suggests that a mother who’s partner is supportive of breastfeeding is more likely to reach their breastfeeding goals. I think this has a lot to do with the fact that when the baby’s parents are on the same page about breastfeeding, it helps them to make informed decisions about what is best for their baby and how to access support if there are breastfeeding challenges. Before a baby arrives, a partner can Go to a breastfeeding education session Learn about what’s normal for breastfed infants Talk to the mother about what their breastfeeding plan Know where to get help if it’s needed After the baby arrives, a partner can Advocate for your baby.  This means that the partner can be the ‘gate-keeper’ to the baby for hospital staff and visitors.  It may mean that you ask for information before making decisions, ask about alternatives, organise the visitors so that the mother can spend her time and energy on getting breastfeeding off to a good start and generally trying to make sure the mother and baby are supported. Do all the nappy changing (I can hear you groan, but she DID carry the baby).  This helps the partner to be aware of the fact that what goes in must come out.  It is often the partners who suggest that the baby is ‘always hungry’ and this can help them to see what the baby is really getting. Settle the baby after/between feeds.  Babies quickly learn that love comes from people other than their mother (and that love is not always associated with food).  Partners often develop a wonderful way of settling babies that is very different to the way a mother settles them.  This can really help the mum feel nurtured and the partner feel important and necessary in their baby’s life. Take the baby while mum sleeps.   This means that the mum can catch up on some sleep while the partner spends time bonding and getting to know their baby. Bath the baby.  Many partners find that bath time is a special time for them to spend with their baby.  It’s a great time to look at their little fingers and toes and see just how much they’re growing. Put the baby in a sling/carrier and go for a walk.  Even very young babies enjoy being out of the house – the backyard is a good place to start.  Make sure they are dressed appropriately for the weather. Have your support numbers handy.  Before you even have the baby, get your hands on the contact numbers in case you need breastfeeding support.  Put them on the fridge or obvious place and RING THEM if you have questions. Recognise the amazing effort.  Mums often feel like beginners at parenting and breastfeeding or...

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Galactagogues (things that improve your milk supply)

Posted by on Jul 21, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges | 3 comments

Galactagogues (things that improve your milk supply)

The word galactagogue means a herb or medication that is commonly used to increase milk supply.  Some of these have been used safely for many, many years and others are relatively new. Different galactagogues are thought to work in different ways.  Some of the prescription medications are developed for another purpose (like controlling nausea) and the increase in milk supply was noted as a side effect.  Some of the herbs are taken as tablets, as a hot drink or mixed with food.  Prescription medications can only be obtained with a script from a doctor. When considering starting a galactagogue, there should always be a careful look at what is actually happening with the baby and with the mother.  There are many situations which can be remedied quickly by a simple change in the approach to feeding.  For some mums, simply letting the baby access the breast more would be enough to improve her supply. For other people, more involved strategies are needed, and these should be overseen by a lactation consultant (IBCLC).  This includes situations involving the baby not being able to maintain the mother’s supply.  When the breastfeeding management strategies are not enough, it may be time to consider a galactagogue. One of the most important things to remember is this – no matter what/how many galactagogues you take,  IF THE BREAST IS NOT DRAINED WELL AND FREQUENTLY, THEY PROBABLY WON’T WORK. If you are considering starting on a galactagogue, or are struggling with low supply, you might like to contact me to discuss your situation or book in for a consultation.  If you’ve used a galactagogue and have any comments about it, I’d love to see a comment from you...

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Breastfeeding Is Good For Mums Too

Posted by on Jul 12, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Breastfeeding Is Good For Mums Too

There are many advantages to breastfeeding – most people know how healthy it is for our babies, but not so many people know about the major advantages to us – THE MUMS.  Breastfeeding your baby is good for you -it…. Reduces a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer Reduces the risk of obesity in later life Women who breastfed for at least six months, in line with Government recommendations, had a lower body mass index in their 50s than those who had not Reduces risk of ovarian cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and many other serious health conditions If you need help reaching your breastfeeding goals, you can contact me to discuss your situation.  ...

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Keeping Warm

Posted by on Jul 4, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Painful Breastfeeding, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Keeping Warm

For mothers and babies it can take some time to adjust to cooler temperatures.  Babies can begin to wake more frequently and mother’s nipples can have a painful reaction when exposed to the cold air. Babies are born very immature.  They need a lot from their parents – one of them being warmth.  Immediately after birth, the best way to keep a baby warm is to place them skin-to-skin with their mother, wrap the two of them up and leave them be. Once you get your baby home, they need to have their temperature regulated by you.  Some babies will wake frequently through the night if they are not comfortable with the temperature.  When the weather’s chilly, it can be a bit of a challenge to know what to dress them in and how to keep them at the right temperature.  Again, having lots of skin-to-skin time is great, but it’s just not practical to do skin-to-skin all day every day until they’re 6 months old, so we need to put some strategies in place to keep them cosy.  Here’s some ideas Dress them in a singlet, nappy and all-in-one suit with layers over Have your baby sleep in the same room as you.  This way you are more likely to be aware of the room temperature and can adjust it if necessary Heat the room to a suitable temperature Use safe bedding to either wrap them or cover them in the cot/bassinette/rocker etc Sometimes babies can be distracted by wraps and blankets when they are first learning to feed, so this is when you can have them in just the basics then cover the both of you It’s not just the baby who needs to keep warm.  When breastfeeding, sometimes a mum’s tummy is exposed to the cool air.  There are many styles of breastfeeding tops available that help cover the tummy and only expose the least amount of skin possible. Sometimes the cold can exacerbate a condition called nipple vasospasm.  This means that the cold stimulates a reaction in the nipple which is very painful.  If you need information on this, please contact me. So, while the weather’s cool, rug up and enjoy a bit of snuggle time with your little one – it keeps everyone warm and is a great way to bond with your...

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Skin-To-Skin Time

Posted by on Jun 27, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Skin-To-Skin Time

‘Skin-to-skin’ is a term used to describe a mother and baby who are in direct contact with eachother without any barrier in between.  There has been alot of discussion and research around the topic of skin-to-skin.  This post should help you to understand when and why skin-to-skin time is used. A WHO review of the literature showed that “skin-to-skin contact between the mother and her baby immediately after birth reduces crying, improves mother-infant interaction, keeps the baby warm, and helps the mother to breastfeed successfully.” In an article written by Dr Sarah Buckley, she says that “Another study showed that, after skin to skin care, newborns had more organized behavior, more quiet sleep and more resistance to pain, again reflecting lower levels of stress and stress hormones.”  and “Skin to skin contact also helps the newborn to enact their instinctive behaviors, including breastfeeding behaviour.” According to an article by Dr Jack Newman here, “skin to skin contact immediately after birth, which lasts for at least an hour has the following positive effects on the baby: Are more likely to latch on Are more likely to latch on well Have more stable and normal skin temperatures Have more stable and normal heart rates and blood pressures Have higher blood sugars Are less likely to cry Are more likely to breastfeed exclusively longer “ So when is it useful to have your baby skin-to-skin with you?  Immediately after your baby is born For the first few days of life When a baby is still learning to attach well Any time when breastfeeding needs improving When a mum is trying to improve her milk supply When a baby is seeking comfort Any time you like If you would like more information on ways to get breastfeeding off to a great start or if things are not going as expected, please contact me to discuss your situation and see if a consultation would be helpful for...

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Returning To Work When You’re Breastfeeding – Part 3

Posted by on Jun 11, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Returning To Work When You’re Breastfeeding – Part 3

This is Part 3 in a series of posts about how to manage breastfeeding while returning to (paid) work.  Returning to work can present some challenges, but with the right information and support, these challenges (like other breastfeeding challenges) can be negotiated and overcome. Part 1 covered the planning stage – when you’re leaving work and going on maternity leave.  Part 2 talks about what happens when your baby has arrived and you’re starting to look at returning to work.  This post talks about the final preparations for returning to work. What Do I feed My Baby?  Of course as an IBCLC, I’d say breastmilk, but it’s not me returning to work (this time anyway).  Many people continue to exclusively breastfeed their babies while returning to work.  Others express breastmilk to be given while their baby is away from them and others choose to combine a breastmilk substitute with breastfeeding (mixed feeding).  The most important thing about making this decision is to be informed about the risks and benefits of all your options.  If your baby is 6 months old, you can combine breastmilk /breastfeeding and solids. Have A Practice Run.  Some mums like to have a practice run.  This can help you feel more comfortable about leaving your baby when returning to work, and can give the planned caregiver a feel of how things might go.  You might like to consider doing this a little way out from your return to work date, so that you have time to make any adjustments. Give It A Go.  Sometimes the only way to know how things are going to work out is to give it a go.  There’s only so much planning and preparation you can do, then it’s time to see how it goes.  Be prepared to adjust things and do some fine-tuning before it runs smoothly. So, as you can see there are a number of things you can do to help make the transition back to work easier.  Many mothers continue to breastfeed their little ones for many reasons.  There are health reasons for the baby and mother, the fact that mothers of breastfed babies are less likely to need time off for ill babies and above all, mothers love the fact that they can continue to have the close bond that is an integral part of breastfeeding during a time of separation. If you are planning on going back to work and would like to know more, you can contact me to discuss your options.  Having breastfed my children and returning to work while doing so, I have a unique insight into the challenges and rewards that you may...

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Returning To Work When You’re Breastfeeding – Part 2

Posted by on Jun 4, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Returning To Work When You’re Breastfeeding – Part 2

This is Part 2 in a series of posts about how to manage breastfeeding while returning to (paid) work.  Returning to work can present some challenges, but with the right information and support, these challenges (like other breastfeeding challenges) can be negotiated and overcome. It CAN work.  You CAN continue to breastfeed your baby.  A few things can be done to make the transition easier for both of you.  Part 1 covered the planning stage when you’re leaving work and going on maternity leave.  Part 2 talks about what happens when your baby has arrived and you’re starting to look at returning to work. Establish Your Milk Supply.  If you are returning to work while your baby is quite young, it will be particularly important to work on establishing a good milk supply.  Having some extra milk stored in the freezer can take some of the pressure off when the time comes to get back to work. Make A Plan.  Once your milk is established, make a plan of how you are going to go about the logistics of pumping/storing/giving your breastmilk.  An IBCLC can help make a manageable plan for your return to work including how to maintain your supply, how much EBM your baby may need and how to encourage your baby to breastfeed when you are there. Learn About Expressing & Storing Breastmilk.  If you are going to be spending more than just a few hours away from your baby, you might like to look into a double electric breast pump.  You can hire or buy various brands.  Start expressing and storing your milk at least a month out from your return to work date if possible.  This will give you time to get used to the pump and ensure you have enough milk available. Once you’ve had your little one, established your milk supply and looked at your options for collecting and storing your breastmilk, take the time to enjoy your little one.  It can get a bit hectic when it comes time to go back to work, and there’ll be more information about dealing with this in part 3 of this series.     Image by David Castillo...

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Returning To Work When You’re Breastfeeding – Part 1

Posted by on May 29, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Returning To Work When You’re Breastfeeding – Part 1

This is Part 1 of a series of posts about how to manage breastfeeding while returning to (paid) work.  Returning to work can present some challenges, but with the right information and support, these challenges (like other breastfeeding challenges) can be negotiated and overcome.  Part 1 focuses on what you can do before the baby arrives to help the transition when you do go back to work. It CAN work.  You CAN continue to breastfeed your baby.  A few things can be done to make the transition easier for both of you. Before you leave work to have your baby, look into your options for returning.  Look into your leave entitlements, government support, job flexibility and ability to work some of your time from home.  Discuss what flexibility is available if you decide to take more leave than you initially anticipated.  Explore what breastfeeding facilities are available at your workplace.  Can your baby’s caregiver bring your baby to your workplace when they need a feed?  Is there a room where you would feel comfortable expressing milk?  Does your workplace have a child-care facility or family-friendly policy?  Do they have a specific breastfeeding policy?  Are they an accredited Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace? The Age-Old Question…. Do I REALLY have to go back to work?  Sometimes the answer is a resounding yes – for various reasons.  Whether for financial, career or personal reasons some people do have to go back to work.  Others decide to make some life changes in order to delay returning to work. Set A Date.  When you know your return to work date, it will be easier to put a plan together to make the transition easier.  For example mothers returning to work when baby is a few weeks old, will have a very different time than those returning when their baby is nearly one year old.  If your date changes, your plan may just need a little adjustment. Look into your child-care options.  Some people are happy with the local child-care centre, sometimes dad will be the stay-at-home carer.  Maybe nana is happy to look after her grandchild and often it’s a mix of formal and non-formal arrangements that can make going back to work, work.  Look into all your options and choose the one that is the best fit for you and your baby.  Some carers will need information on caring for a breastfed baby.  There is a good booklet produced by the ABA for this purpose (http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bf-info/breastfeeding-and-work/caregivers-guide-breastfed-baby) When you’ve looked into these issues, it’s time to sit back, relax and look forward to holding your little one in your arms. Part 2 of this series will focus on what you can do once baby has arrived to help the transition back to work.  If you’ve got any suggestions or comments I’d love for you to add a comment below. Image by David Castillo...

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