Blog


Thank you for having a look at my blog about all things breastfeeding.  The aim of my blog is to provide up-to-date breastfeeding information, support for mums (and dads) and links to some helpful sites.  I will be aiming to post fairly regularly and am hoping to have some guest bloggers.

A little about me.  I am married and have three beautiful children.  I have worked in ICU (intensive care units) for about 15 years and really enjoyed that part of my life.  I became interested in breastfeeding after my first child was born and breastfeeding didn’t go to plan.  I went on to have a very rewarding breastfeeding relationship with my other two children – thanks to an IBCLC.  Eight years ago I qualified as a breastfeeding counsellor and have subsequently qualified as an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC).

I’m very excited to be able to follow my passion for supporting breastfeeding mother/baby dyads by making it my business.  I look forward to any feedback (good or not so good) and hope you find the blog helpful.

Stacey Revie – IBCLC


Breastfeeding And SIDS

Posted by on May 20, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Lactation Consulting, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Breastfeeding And SIDS

Evidence shows that breastfeeding is protective against SIDS.  Adjunct Professor, Jeanine Young reviewed international evidence and the analysis confirmed the link between a mother breastfeeding her baby and the reduced incidence of SIDS. The author is reported to have described the reason why breastfeeding is protective – ‘We think it’s multifactorial.  We know breastfed babies tend to rouse more easily than bottle-fed babies, and because women breastfeed frequently, the child is roused – and checked on- every few hours.’ Even more information supporting your decision to breastfeed your little one and to help you get through the nights of broken sleep when your baby is waking more frequently than you’d like. Here’s a link to an article from The Australian....

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Too Much Milk?

Posted by on May 9, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Too Much Milk?

When we’re talking breastfeeding most people think more milk is better.  Some mothers, however, have a great ability to produce enough milk for their baby and then some. This can be the case in the early days when the hormones that stimulate milk production go into overdrive.  The mother may feel overfull (engorged).  The baby may have difficulty attaching because of the fullness of the breast. For most people, this initial ‘overdrive’ settles in the coming days and weeks as the baby regulates their supply.  For others, their breasts continue to supply more milk than the baby needs.  This may contribute to a baby whose behaviour is unsettled, who wants to suck very frequently and is producing lots of dirty nappies which may be green and/or frothy. Some mothers with an over abundant supply also find that their milk flow is very fast.  If the milk flows quickly, the baby may be able to deal with it well, or you might hear the baby splutter or come off the breast.  Some mothers find that their baby may cough or sound like they’re choking or milk may come out of their nose.  Some mothers will hear a clicking sound only when the faster milk flows. There are many measures that can be taken to help mothers and babies facing this situation.  Some of them are as simple as a change in feeding position and some of these take more effort and commitment to see improvement. If you’d like to discuss your breastfeeding challenges, please contact me.  As with other breastfeeding challenges, when managed well, this too will come to...

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Painful Breastfeeding

Posted by on Apr 29, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Painful Breastfeeding | 0 comments

Painful Breastfeeding

When mothers are seen breastfeeding their babies, it is often the picture of serenity.  For some mothers this happens straight from birth – the baby goes to the breast for the first time, latches well and takes in the liquid gold.  For others it can be a rocky journey which takes time, patience and assistance to get right. Breastfeeding should NOT be painful.  As Christina Smilie says – pain is the body’s way of guiding us to comfort.  There are many reasons why breastfeeding may be painful.  There may be a simple adjustment which can help the situation such as improving the baby’s position.  The baby may have had a difficult birth and may need supporting for a time until feeding improves.  Some babies have a tongue tie which is restricting the baby’s ability to feed and causing damage to the mother. With all these situations (and others), a lactation consultant can help to work out the cause of the pain and make breastfeeding more comfortable and enjoyable.  If breastfeeding is painful, you can contact me to discuss if your particular situation might benefit from a...

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Is My Baby Getting Enough Milk?

Posted by on Apr 28, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 3 comments

Is My Baby Getting Enough Milk?

There is little else more important to a mother than making sure their baby is being well fed. Many mothers contact breastfeeding counsellors and lactation consultants wondering if they have enough milk for their baby.  They may be concerned because their baby is unsettled, crying, not feeding at predictable times or wanting to feed more often than the mum expected. Sometimes a well-intentioned relative or friend (or partner) can suggest that the baby is always hungry or feeding too often. All these concerns can be very valid at times, but there are a few simple ways to find some reassurance that your baby is getting enough breastmilk.  Your baby is usually getting enough milk if they have Wet nappies – in the first five days of life, a baby will usually have one wet nappy for each day of life (ie three wet nappies on day three).  After this you can expect five heavily wet disposable and 6-8 wet cloth nappies per day while they are exclusively breastfed.  The wet nappies should be pale to clear in colour. Dirty nappies – during the first few days, your baby may pass only meconium (thick, black tare-like poo).  After that your baby’s nappies will start to transition to look more like seedy, yellowish mustard.  Most babies will pass 3-4 of ‘baby-fist-size’ poos in 24hours and some will have a dirty nappy much more frequently. Frequent swallowing that you can hear during a feed and see them sucking vigorously at the breast Weight gain.  All babies loose weight initially, but after a few days should start putting weight back on. There are many things that can influence supply in both the short and long term, including some medical conditions and breast types, but if your baby has enough coming out, then there is usually enough going in. If you are concerned about low supply or would like to discuss increasing your supply, you may like to contact me to decide if you’d benefit from having a consultation.  For some mums, very simple things will increase their supply (like increasing the number of feeds/day) and for other people more active measures are needed.  Either way mums usually find that having up-to-date and consistent information helps improve their...

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Mother-To-Mother Support

Posted by on Apr 23, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Painful Breastfeeding, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Mother-To-Mother Support

When working with a mother, I often get a range of parenting questions mixed in with the breastfeeding ones.  I’m happy to answer these when I can.  Some mothers can feel somewhat isolated when they have a baby and may be looking for information about what to expect from this period of their baby’s life and reassurance that they are meeting their baby’s needs. When a mum’s breastfeeding situation no longer requires an LC, I often suggest they get in contact with their local ABA group.  These groups can be a great source of information, support and friendship with mothers who are in a similar stage of life.  It is also one of the World Health Organisation’s 10-steps to successful breastfeeding. To find your local ABA group, click...

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Caffeine and Breastfeeding

Posted by on Apr 11, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges | 0 comments

Caffeine and Breastfeeding

Many breastfeeding mothers enjoy having a coffee or other caffeinated drink while continuing to breastfeed their baby. Some mothers are concerned about the effects of caffeine on breastfeeding and their baby.   The effects on each mother and baby pair can vary especially in relation to the baby’s age and the amount and type of caffeine consumed. Here’s a link to some basic information that you might find helpful.   ABA info on Caffeine &...

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Milk Banking – The Gift of Breastmilk

Posted by on Apr 2, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Lactation Consulting | 2 comments

Milk Banking – The Gift of Breastmilk

Imagine not being able to give your sick baby the very thing that could help them get better.  For some mothers of sick or very tiny babies, this is the situation they face when, despite their best efforts, they are not able to produce enough breastmilk for their babies.  This is where milk banking comes in. Milk banking is a process where breastmilk is donated to a collection centre, where it is screened, processed and distributed to babies in need.  This process saves many, many lives each year. Last week I was able to listen to a speaker from the Mother’s Milk Bank discuss the process of milk banking here in Queensland.  This service is especially vital for pre-term and multiple birth infants who are at the greatest risk of illness and death if they are not provided with breastmilk.  Some mothers of pre-term and sick babies are unable to produce enough milk to meet their baby’s needs.  It is in these and other cases that the generosity of an anonymous donor and the services provided by a milk bank can make a huge difference. For information on obtaining donated milk or donating milk yourself, you can access their website mothersmilkbank.com.au    ...

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A Pleasant Day At Work

Posted by on Mar 28, 2012 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Lactation Consulting | 0 comments

A Pleasant Day At Work

I really do love the work I do.  Sometimes I get the opportunity to work with a mother and baby who amaze me with their ability.  Last week I was able to witness a mother and baby who, despite lots of trying, had not been able to make breastfeeding work for them.  This diligent mum pumped her milk to maintain her supply and the baby was fed with a bottle.  After a little bit of homework, this baby attached to her very happy mummy and began to feed away.  The mum was impressed by her baby’s ability, and I had goose bumps just watching this peaceful scene. There is still some learning to be done for this mum and bub, but it just goes to show how resilient a baby’s ability to go to the breast can be.  Most research supports that until at least three months of age, a baby’s instincts, abilities and reflexes to breastfeed can be utilised to help guide them back to the breast. It’s not always an easy journey, but guiding a mother and baby back to breastfeeding can be a very rewarding experience for...

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Before Baby Is Born

Posted by on Mar 19, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Lactation Consulting | 2 comments

Before Baby Is Born

I am sometimes asked why I would need to see a pregnant woman about breastfeeding before the baby is even born.  It’s a good question and one that has many answers. Some of the reasons a mother may wish to see an IBCLC during pregnancy are relate to a medical condition she may have.  There are a few medical conditions which mean that the mother needs to keep a particularly close eye on how her baby is feeding.  These may be related to an endocrine disorder, breast surgery or other history.  The aim of these consultations is to do a thorough history and discuss ways to enhance breastfeeding for this baby. Sometimes it is the baby who is expected to have a medical condition which may affect breastfeeding.  In this case, it is often best to be as informed as possible and then see how the baby goes once they arrive.  This can be a very emotional time for parents who are unsure what to expect and need lots of support and reassurance to breastfeed (or breastmilk feed) their baby. Very often a parent is expecting their second or third baby and has had a disappointing breastfeeding journey with their previous child/ren.  It is often very helpful for these people to see an IBCLC before this new baby comes along.  It’s a really good time to look back at what happened last time and put some strategies in place to avoid these (and other) pitfalls this time around.  Sometimes just being able to recognise just what IS normal, can make a difference. Other parents-to-be are interested in being as informed as possible before their first baby comes along.  Often there is a massive focus during pregnancy simply on the actual birth without much emphasis on the breastfeeding journey which is to follow.  My sessions help to inform parents on how they can enhance the likelihood of successful breastfeeding. If you are pregnant and considering a breastfeeding preparation session, please feel free to contact me to discuss whether one of theses sessions would be suitable for you and your situation.  If your partner (or other support person) is interested in attending, I strongly encourage...

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Keeping Up-To-Date

Posted by on Mar 12, 2012 in Blog, Lactation Consulting | 3 comments

Keeping Up-To-Date

Keeping up to date is a big part of being an IBCLC – making sure practice is evidence-based.  This week I have been fortunate enough to experience some local and world-renowned speakers who I found inspiring. Kathleen Marinelli is a neonatologist and Director of her hospital’s Lactation Support Services.  Her dynamic talk was on a gut disorder in babies and breastfeeding’s role in protecting against and minimizing the risks of this illness.  She also gave a talk on her hospital’s treatment of ‘late, pre-term babies’.  Her approach is of careful observation while keeping the mother and baby together whenever possible and only intervening when absolutely necessary. Other speakers discussed the risks involved of offering babies ‘Just One Bottle’ and a update on current research happening in Perth. These topics have implications for me as an IBCLC – both in terms of my practice and awareness of what a mother may have experienced before I see them in a consultation.  It’s a pleasure to keep abreast of current topics with speakers like this. Image by Kookai...

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The Great Dummy Debate – A Personal Perspective From An IBCLC

Posted by on Mar 5, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Lactation Consulting, Painful Breastfeeding, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

The Great Dummy Debate – A Personal Perspective From An IBCLC

All my children had dummies…. Was this a good thing?  The answer is both yes and no for me.  For my first child, having a dummy was the means to an end and also the beginning of a slippery slope to early weaning. When I brought my first beautiful newborn baby home from hospital, I was elated.  This lovely scene came crashing down around me when breastfeeding went very wrong.  My baby was drowsy and I was getting more and more frustrated that she wasn’t feeding.  Eventually after she became more alert, she REALLY wanted to feed.  By this stage breastfeeding was excruciating.  I dreaded attaching this beautiful little bubba to my breast to feed.  I started trying anything I could to delay feeding her and stretch the feeds out.  This inevitably led to using a dummy.  There were two things wrong with this. Firstly, she was crying because she wanted to feed and make up for the days that she had been drowsy.  She was showing me all the feeding cues and I just didn’t recognise them.  Also, my breasts were not getting the stimulation they needed to make the amount of milk my baby needed. Secondly, she was already attaching poorly and introducing a foreign teat which in no way stretches and functions like a breast was, in my opinion, contributing to her trouble. In the end I couldn’t face the toe-curling pain with each feed and chose to express my breastmilk and feed it to her with a bottle.  I was disappointed and sad that breastfeeding hadn’t worked out for me.  It wasn’t all about the dummy, but it certainly didn’t help. My second and third babies also had dummies.  This time around I was more informed and more determined to get things right.  So I chose to focus on establishing breastfeeding as a priority after I had the baby – electing to use other settling techniques and delaying the use of a dummy until about 6-8 weeks.  When I did use the dummy it was sparingly and when I knew that the baby’s tummy was full.  I tuned into my babies and looked for feeding cues, I also realised that I had a limited milk storage capacity and that my babies really NEEDED to feed frequently to thrive – which they did.  I used the dummy to help them to get to sleep, in the car on short trips when I couldn’t feed them and when I had to attend to my other children briefly. In the end they were both exclusively breastfed until 6 months and went on to breastfeed until I chose to wean them. From an IBCLC’s point of view there are both pro’s and con’s to dummy use.  It can help in certain specific breastfeeding situations – to encourage a premature baby’s sucking for example.  It can also hinder by reducing a mother’s milk supply, reducing a baby’s nutritional intake and by introducing something other than a mother’s breast into a baby’s mouth.  Some people refer to this as nipple confusion – some people don’t believe in such a thing, but what I take away from this is that some babies are more susceptible to having poor attachment when exposed to using a dummy than others.  You won’t know if this will be a problem for...

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Sleep Routine Books

Posted by on Feb 27, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Lactation Consulting, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 4 comments

Sleep Routine Books

I often get asked which sleep/routine book I recommend for babies.  The answer is a difficult one – there are so many out there.  What I usually ask mothers of new babies is why they expect their baby to be in a routine?  I felt pressure from a whole range of people to ‘have my baby in a routine’.  As a first time mum, I thought this was something I really had to instil in my baby.  I thought that as ‘good parents’ we had to teach our baby to sleep through, feed at predictable times and have a nap when it was convenient for me. It wasn’t until later that I became more educated about breastfeeding.  This helped me realised how trying to get babies to ‘fit in’ to our expectations instead of tuning in to our baby’s needs can compromise some people’s ability to breastfeed.  Some breastfeeding issues do effect a baby’s ability to sleep or settle, and if you’re concerned that this is the case you can contact me to see if a consultation would be appropriate. Some of the side-effects of enforcing a routine on your baby can be detrimental to breastfeeding.  If your baby is crying because they are hungry and this cry is not heeded, at least two things happen.  The baby will not have his needs met and the mother’s breasts do not receive the stimulation they need to maintain her milk supply.  If this continues, a baby is at risk of poor weight gains and the mother is at risk of a diminishing supply.  Sometimes, like me, hindsight tells us we could have made better choices. Do I like any of these books?  Absolutely.  Any book which supports a mother to listen to and respond gently to her baby has a role to play.  Having a variety of tools in your ‘parenting toolbox’ can be a great benefit. If you’re looking for a book to help you with some parenting, sleeping and breastfeeding issues, I suggest you read whatever you like – take from it things that you think suit your parenting style, is gentle with it’s approach,  and supports feeding your baby when they are hungry – and discard the rest. As babies get older, they often find their own natural pattern of feeding and sleeping.  When we tune in to our babies, we are more likely to pick up on the cues they are giving us.  We don’t need a book to tell us that.   Photo: Dynamite...

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Alcohol and Breastfeeding

Posted by on Feb 24, 2012 in Blog, Lactation Consulting, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Alcohol and Breastfeeding

In the latest ‘Essence’ magazine (published by the ABA), an article discusses some recent research which estimates the number of Australian women who drink alcohol while pregnant, breastfeeding or pregnant and breastfeeding. Quoting the research, Essence says that 29% of those who were pregnant, 43% of those who were breastfeeding and 36% of those who were both pregnant and breastfeeding drank alcohol.  The article goes on to point out some risks involved with drinking alcohol when pregnant or breastfeeding and those mothers who are more likely to drink alcohol. Am I surprised by the findings?  Not at all.  When doing consultations, part of my initial history involves talking about how much alcohol the mother is consuming.  The reason I ask about alcohol is two-fold. Firstly, there are risks involved in drinking alcohol in pregnancy and during breastfeeding, and the mother needs to be able to make an informed decision about alcohol consumption.  Being informed can help the mother to make choices that minimise the risks to her baby. Secondly, some mothers find that drinking alcohol inhibits their let-down.  This can be a real challenge if you are already struggling with low-supply or have a baby who needs some encouraging to go to the breast. The ABA article went on to discuss a brochure it has produced called ‘Alcohol and breastfeeding: a guide for mothers’, in which it gives some guidelines about timing of drinks and levels of alcohol in breastmilk.   Original research – Prevalence and predictors of alcohol use in pregnancy and breastfeeding among Australian women  Maloney E, HutchinsonD, Burns L, Mattick RP, Black E 2011, Birth 38:1 Article discussed in LRC section Essence Magazine, March 2012, 48:2...

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Breastfeeding In Public?

Posted by on Feb 14, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Lactation Consulting, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 2 comments

Breastfeeding In Public?

When you’re expecting your first baby you often have some really firm ideas about what you are and are not going to do with your baby.  You may not be sure how you feel about some things.  Feeding your baby in public is one of those topics that can polarise people.  So, let’s look at the facts. Babies are born with small tummies and exclusively breastfed babies digest their perfect food efficiently, so it moves through their gut quite quickly.  This all adds up to small babies needing to be fed fairly frequently.  Older babies can also go through periods where they need to feed more frequently than usual.  These situations, in themselves, are not an issue until you find yourself out in public with a baby who is showing all the signs of needing a feed.  What do you do? The answer to this is as individual as each mother/baby pair.  Some people feel very comfortable attending to their baby’s breastfeeding requirements when ever and where ever the baby needs.  So, for these people, it’s a simple matter of finding a comfortable position for themselves and their baby and getting on with it.  Remember, you are allowed to feed your baby anywhere!  There are very few exceptions to this rule. Other people are more concerned about feeding in public.  They may feel exposed or vulnerable feeding their baby in a public place.  For these people a quite corner of a café, a feeding room at a shop or in the passenger seat of the car can be a safe private place for them to meet their baby’s needs.  Some people choose to attach their baby and cover them with a wrap or baby-feeding cape.  This works for some people, and not for others – particularly as the baby gets older and wants to see what is happening around them.  Some mothers find that newer styles of breastfeeding-friendly clothing make them feel less exposed when they do need to feed in public, or that by sitting in front of a mirror and feeding their baby, they may be able to tell that actually, not a lot of skin or breast is visible when a baby is attached. Or, like a lot of people, you may find you are a mixture of both.  You may feel comfortable feeding in public in certain situations and in front of certain people, and with other people and locations you may feel that you would like to cover yourself or your feeding baby. No matter what your feelings on feeding in public, the most important thing is to do what works for you and your baby.  Feeding your baby when they need it is much easier when you feel comfortable.  You are more likely to get a quick let-down and be able to enjoy those lovely hormones, released with each feed, that make you feel like everything is going to be OK.   (Above photo by Nutdanai...

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What is an IBCLC & When Do I Need One?

Posted by on Feb 2, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Lactation Consulting, Painful Breastfeeding | 1 comment

What is an IBCLC & When Do I Need One?

An IBCLC (International Board Certified Lactation Consultant) is a person who has worked with breastfeeding mothers and babies for an extended time, accrued significant professional development hours and has sat and passed an international level exam set by the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE).  IBCLC’s are specialists in their field and are a reference point for any breastfeeding issue. Many IBCLC’s come from a mother-to-mother breastfeeding counsellor or midwifery background.  Some are registered nurses from a hospital setting, others have been allied health professionals.   All lactation consultants who have IBCLC after their name, however, have attained the highest standard in the specialty of breastfeeding – regardless of their background. The role of an IBCLC is usually in one of two areas.  There are often IBCLC’s employed by maternity hospitals to support mothers who birth in that hospital during the post-natal period.  Others go into private practice and support mothers during pregnancy and after the birth of their baby. Research supports the fact that mothers (& their partners) who receive breastfeeding education before their baby is born are more likely to have better breastfeeding outcomes.  IBCLC’s have an indepth knowledge of issues which may effect breastfeeding and can provide an individual assessment before a baby arrives. IBCLC’s are a wealth of knowledge after your baby is born and can help with all breastfeeding related issues.  Whether a baby is having trouble attaching, breastfeeding is painful or there is concern about milk supply – if it’s breastfeeding related, an IBCLC will be able to help. If you’re returning to work, an IBCLC can help you to plan for the transition.  Both mother and baby will need to adjust to the changes, and input from an IBCLC can help make the transition as smooth as possible. Some IBCLC’s provide professional inservice sessions and conference lectures.  Some are authors of fantastic books or run online breastfeeding education sites. So, IBCLC’s are highly qualified health professionals that have a wide-ranging role in supporting breastfeeding mother/baby dyads in a variety of...

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Upcoming topics

Posted by on Jan 28, 2012 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges | 0 comments

Upcoming topics

Just a quick post to welcome you to my site and blog.  The information on this blog is general and is not suitable for all mother/baby circumstances.  Hopefully you’ll find it helpful and informative.  Some upcoming topics cover dummy use, returning to work and breastfeeding while you’re out and about.  I welcome your feedback and suggestions for topics.  Happy Parenting. Stacey.

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Breastfeeding Challenges

Posted by on Sep 15, 2010 in Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Painful Breastfeeding | 0 comments

Breastfeeding Challenges

When you’re experiencing breastfeeding challenges, it can be a time of great vulnerability.  The emotion that comes with a breastfeeding experience which is less than rewarding can be very strong, even overwhelming sometimes.  Having been through a disappointing breastfeeding experience with my first baby, I can very much relate to the feelings and frustration that can come from breastfeeding challenges. That’s why it is so important to get the right help early.  For some people it means having a consultation before the baby arrives so they have a clearer picture of what to expect once their baby is born and is breastfeeding.  It may mean looking back at what has happened to contribute to the situation so it can be changed.  For others it means recognising that either things are not going well or are not improving.  Sometimes just recognising what is normal for newborns can help. Often breastfeeding challenges are easily rectified.  Some may be ongoing or need more complex management.  Most mothers find that the effort they put in to overcome their breastfeeding challenge is well worth it. Breastfeeding is NOT MEANT TO BE PAINFUL.  If it is, you might like to contact me to decide if you need a...

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Parenting Your Breastfed Baby

Posted by on Sep 15, 2010 in Before Baby Arrives, Blog, Breastfeeding Challenges, Parenting Your Breastfed Baby | 0 comments

Parenting Your Breastfed Baby

Parenting a breastfed baby can be a rewarding and fulfilling experience.  It comes with a whole world of new experiences – the bond when your baby snuggles in for a feed, the satisfaction of seeing them grow just from your milk and the peace of mind that comes with knowing you’re setting them up with the healthiest start to life. Sometimes you might feel a little unsupported in your breastfeeding journey.  That’s when a network of mothers who are currently breastfeeding or have breastfed, can be a great source of  information and encouragement.  Your local Australian Breastfeeding Association group can be a valuable resorce to you.  Many mothers who are members have been through similar experiences and can offer some friendly support. In the coming blogs, I hope to open the door to the many benefits of parenting a baby that is...

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