A Mother’s Testimonial

Here’s a testimonial that I received from a lovely mum I worked with. “I contacted Stacey after a recommendation by a relative, and my baby and I are very thankful to have utilised her services.  At 6 weeks of age my baby began crying constantly and not sleeping.  My husband and I were at the end of our tether not completely understanding why.  Stacey was quick to realise the problem had been not enough food as I had been advised to feed on one breast every 3 hours due to an oversupply of foremilk that was causing baby very painful wind.  She helped me to get back to recognising my baby’s needs rather than a set routine that obviously was not working.  I instantly had a contented baby and although looking back on it now it would have made sense to see I had a hungry baby – sticking to the advice I was given, attending to a very distressed baby and sleep deprivation had really clouded my judgment.   Stacey also reassured me my baby was getting plenty of milk after assessing a feed.  Soon after increasing the feeds, offering both breasts and relaxing with the ‘routines’ that I had read so much about in books, I had a much more relaxed baby who began sleeping through the night when she was 7 weeks old.  As Stacey had suggested she would find her own sleeping pattern with time and she did.  Stacey also helped me work out a plan for returning to work that was excellent and put my mind at ease that it is possible to carry on with breastfeeding while working.   I thank Stacey for the way she was compassionate and understanding through the whole consultation.  Stacey was also very in tune with the demands and guilt that mothers feel and was very proactive in recognising and helping deal with my emotional health issues.   Her follow-up emails were a great support.  As breastfeeding comes with many challenges and ongoing changes as baby develops I would recommend Stacey’s lactation services to any breastfeeding mum who find themselves confused by all of the advice out there that isn’t working for them.” Danielle F For more testimonials from mums, please check out my testimonials...
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Breastfed Babies and Colds

During the cooler months, it seems more common for babies (and parents) to get a cold.  For adults this can be a minor inconvenience, but what about your baby?  Babies are obligatory nose-breathers, meaning they usually breathe through their nose.  When your baby gets a cold they may have a blocked nose, making feeding more challenging.  Breastfeeding during this time will Provide your baby with the components in breastmilk that combat illness Sustain your baby’s nutritional needs Maintain your supply Provide comfort for your baby who may not be feeling 100% During this time you may like to Allow your baby to feed frequently – they may prefer smaller feeds for a few days Allow your baby to come off and back on the breast several times during a feed.  If they are finding it difficult to breathe through a blocked nose, they may stop feeding in order to breathe Try putting a few drops of breast milk in their nose to help clear the mucous Spend lots of time comforting and cuddling a baby that is not feeling well and keep an eye on them.   If you are concerned about their health you might like to take them to contact a health professional, or call 13HEALTH (if in QLD). If your baby isn’t draining the breast well for a few days, you might like to consider whether you need to express some milk to maintain your supply during this time.  If you think you need some breastfeeding support during this time, you might like to contact me to arrange a...
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Galactagogues (things that improve your milk supply)

The word galactagogue means a herb or medication that is commonly used to increase milk supply.  Some of these have been used safely for many, many years and others are relatively new. Different galactagogues are thought to work in different ways.  Some of the prescription medications are developed for another purpose (like controlling nausea) and the increase in milk supply was noted as a side effect.  Some of the herbs are taken as tablets, as a hot drink or mixed with food.  Prescription medications can only be obtained with a script from a doctor. When considering starting a galactagogue, there should always be a careful look at what is actually happening with the baby and with the mother.  There are many situations which can be remedied quickly by a simple change in the approach to feeding.  For some mums, simply letting the baby access the breast more would be enough to improve her supply. For other people, more involved strategies are needed, and these should be overseen by a lactation consultant (IBCLC).  This includes situations involving the baby not being able to maintain the mother’s supply.  When the breastfeeding management strategies are not enough, it may be time to consider a galactagogue. One of the most important things to remember is this – no matter what/how many galactagogues you take,  IF THE BREAST IS NOT DRAINED WELL AND FREQUENTLY, THEY PROBABLY WON’T WORK. If you are considering starting on a galactagogue, or are struggling with low supply, you might like to contact me to discuss your situation or book in for a consultation.  If you’ve used a galactagogue and have any comments about it, I’d love to see a comment from you...
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Keeping Warm

For mothers and babies it can take some time to adjust to cooler temperatures.  Babies can begin to wake more frequently and mother’s nipples can have a painful reaction when exposed to the cold air. Babies are born very immature.  They need a lot from their parents – one of them being warmth.  Immediately after birth, the best way to keep a baby warm is to place them skin-to-skin with their mother, wrap the two of them up and leave them be. Once you get your baby home, they need to have their temperature regulated by you.  Some babies will wake frequently through the night if they are not comfortable with the temperature.  When the weather’s chilly, it can be a bit of a challenge to know what to dress them in and how to keep them at the right temperature.  Again, having lots of skin-to-skin time is great, but it’s just not practical to do skin-to-skin all day every day until they’re 6 months old, so we need to put some strategies in place to keep them cosy.  Here’s some ideas Dress them in a singlet, nappy and all-in-one suit with layers over Have your baby sleep in the same room as you.  This way you are more likely to be aware of the room temperature and can adjust it if necessary Heat the room to a suitable temperature Use safe bedding to either wrap them or cover them in the cot/bassinette/rocker etc Sometimes babies can be distracted by wraps and blankets when they are first learning to feed, so this is when you can have them in just the basics then cover the both of you It’s not just the baby who needs to keep warm.  When breastfeeding, sometimes a mum’s tummy is exposed to the cool air.  There are many styles of breastfeeding tops available that help cover the tummy and only expose the least amount of skin possible. Sometimes the cold can exacerbate a condition called nipple vasospasm.  This means that the cold stimulates a reaction in the nipple which is very painful.  If you need information on this, please contact me. So, while the weather’s cool, rug up and enjoy a bit of snuggle time with your little one – it keeps everyone warm and is a great way to bond with your...
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Skin-To-Skin Time

‘Skin-to-skin’ is a term used to describe a mother and baby who are in direct contact with eachother without any barrier in between.  There has been alot of discussion and research around the topic of skin-to-skin.  This post should help you to understand when and why skin-to-skin time is used. A WHO review of the literature showed that “skin-to-skin contact between the mother and her baby immediately after birth reduces crying, improves mother-infant interaction, keeps the baby warm, and helps the mother to breastfeed successfully.” In an article written by Dr Sarah Buckley, she says that “Another study showed that, after skin to skin care, newborns had more organized behavior, more quiet sleep and more resistance to pain, again reflecting lower levels of stress and stress hormones.”  and “Skin to skin contact also helps the newborn to enact their instinctive behaviors, including breastfeeding behaviour.” According to an article by Dr Jack Newman here, “skin to skin contact immediately after birth, which lasts for at least an hour has the following positive effects on the baby: Are more likely to latch on Are more likely to latch on well Have more stable and normal skin temperatures Have more stable and normal heart rates and blood pressures Have higher blood sugars Are less likely to cry Are more likely to breastfeed exclusively longer “ So when is it useful to have your baby skin-to-skin with you?  Immediately after your baby is born For the first few days of life When a baby is still learning to attach well Any time when breastfeeding needs improving When a mum is trying to improve her milk supply When a baby is seeking comfort Any time you like If you would like more information on ways to get breastfeeding off to a great start or if things are not going as expected, please contact me to discuss your situation and see if a consultation would be helpful for...
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Returning To Work When You’re Breastfeeding – Part 3

This is Part 3 in a series of posts about how to manage breastfeeding while returning to (paid) work.  Returning to work can present some challenges, but with the right information and support, these challenges (like other breastfeeding challenges) can be negotiated and overcome. Part 1 covered the planning stage – when you’re leaving work and going on maternity leave.  Part 2 talks about what happens when your baby has arrived and you’re starting to look at returning to work.  This post talks about the final preparations for returning to work. What Do I feed My Baby?  Of course as an IBCLC, I’d say breastmilk, but it’s not me returning to work (this time anyway).  Many people continue to exclusively breastfeed their babies while returning to work.  Others express breastmilk to be given while their baby is away from them and others choose to combine a breastmilk substitute with breastfeeding (mixed feeding).  The most important thing about making this decision is to be informed about the risks and benefits of all your options.  If your baby is 6 months old, you can combine breastmilk /breastfeeding and solids. Have A Practice Run.  Some mums like to have a practice run.  This can help you feel more comfortable about leaving your baby when returning to work, and can give the planned caregiver a feel of how things might go.  You might like to consider doing this a little way out from your return to work date, so that you have time to make any adjustments. Give It A Go.  Sometimes the only way to know how things are going to work out is to give it a go.  There’s only so much planning and preparation you can do, then it’s time to see how it goes.  Be prepared to adjust things and do some fine-tuning before it runs smoothly. So, as you can see there are a number of things you can do to help make the transition back to work easier.  Many mothers continue to breastfeed their little ones for many reasons.  There are health reasons for the baby and mother, the fact that mothers of breastfed babies are less likely to need time off for ill babies and above all, mothers love the fact that they can continue to have the close bond that is an integral part of breastfeeding during a time of separation. If you are planning on going back to work and would like...
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